Teaching English in Italy – Casinalbo-Modena

Published: 06 December, 2016  |  Last updated: 06 December, 2016

Teaching English in Casinalbo-Modena, Italy

italy_casinalbo-modena

Report submitted on 30 Nov, 2016 by Stella.

Teaching English in Casinalbo-Modena, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Casinalbo-Modena, Italy?
I teach English privately at home, only for children.

Initially I was asked by a few mum’s from my daughter’s class and then through word of mouth I managed to get two groups of children to teach.

The main English teaching jobs available are:
Teaching at private international schools, teaching at companies, teaching at community centers, etc., private teaching (not through a school, agency, etc.)

There are lots of private bilingual schools around Modena that are always looking for qualified teachers, also there are many companies that hire private teachers to teach English for their employers.

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
You need to have some teaching qualifications and experience, they valued mother tongue a lot and that’s the level they require ( proficiency).

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
In my area of working with children, if you would like to work in schools you will have to be a qualify teacher, or have some other degree and be able to teach English.

What are the levels of payment?
On private group lessons like mine, it is about €10 (approx. 10.50 US $) p/h

How many teaching days a week is normal?
I do it twice by choice , but there are always more demand. 

How many face-to-face teaching hours a week is normal?
2 hours per week

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
I don’t know.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Casinalbo-Modena, Italy to teach English?
Start with after school groups, as a bilingual monitor, then after getting some experience you can try to offer private lessons.

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Casinalbo-Modena, Italy?
They value English as a second language, they want their children to learn and they look for it.

There is a good demand.

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Casinalbo-Modena, Italy?
Distance and long period of holidays in summer, which then you would have to find something else to do.

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in your area?
For me it is the qualifications.

 

Living in Casinalbo-Modena, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
If outside EU, yes

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
I’ll say it is on a medium level, all depends on where you live.

I have a family and I teach privately for some extra cash, I couldn’t live on what I make teaching, I do it part-time, but there are people who do it full-time of course.

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
You have to find on your own, through agency or news paper

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Casinalbo-Modena, Italy?
Lots.

Is is beautiful and adventurous, the food is fantastic, the people are nice and friendly. I love Italy!

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in scenery, Italy?
Technology is about 10 years behind in here!

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Casinalbo-Modena, Italy?
Be patient, have all your papers ready and come with a job lined up already.

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
I miss how simple and easy things were/ are in UK.

I miss the practicality and the technology, and how the costumer is always right!

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Italy?
The weather, the scenery, the mountains, the food….. and the lovely friends I made here!

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country?
You can find anything in Italy, even if it is a little harder or more expensive.

I believe people should adapt to their new environment.

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Stella

NationalityBrazilian/British

Students I’ve taught in Italy: Pre-school / kindergarten (4-6 years), elementary (6-12 years).

Where I teach: I teach at home, after school, usually for children from my own children’s class.

Teaching for 4 years.

How I found my current jobsWord of mouth
 

My school facilities: Very good. I have a room that I use for the lessons and I have everything I need!

Do you teach English in Italy?

Tell us about your experiences – click here to submit your report about teaching English in Italy.

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Teaching English in Italy – Fara in Sabina

Published: 16 September, 2016  |  Last updated: 16 September, 2016

Teaching English in Fara in Sabina, Italy

farainsabina_italy

Report submitted on 21 Apr, 2016 by Liz.

Teaching English in Fara in Sabina, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Fara in Sabina, Italy?
The main teaching jobs can be found in Rome with most of the large international schools. Smaller schools often advertise on their websites or alternatively on TEFL.com

The main English teaching jobs available are:
Full time English language school positions, part time English language school positions, agencies (send teachers to different locations), teaching at companies.

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
Although many private language schools advertise that they want CELTA they will accept other certificates as well as just experience.

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
Clearly a CELTA will get you into the better/larger schools but it not necessarily linked to a better salary. Try to get some form of certification and experience under your belt.

What are the levels of payment?
Payment ranges from 10-18 euros per hour gross (approx. US$ 11-20).

How many teaching days a week is normal?
6 days per week.

How many face-to-face teaching hours a week is normal?
20-30 hours per week.

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
It depends on how the school is run and organised.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Fara in Sabina, Italy to teach English?
Italy is a fantastic country to live in but bureaucracy is a nightmare. Arm yourself with tonnes of patience.

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Fara in Sabina, Italy?
Italians need mother tongue English speakers so there is no shortage of work and generally they are very nice welcoming people.

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Fara in Sabina, Italy?
As before bureaucracy can be infuriating, and things often get changed at the last minute. You need to be really patient and flexible.

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in your area?
Many of the challenges regard adult learners who have been taught badly in the past and have to unlearn before they can relearn, or the immediacy of learning English “last minute”.

 

Living in Fara in Sabina, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
Not for EU citizens

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
Clearly the centre of Rome is like any other major city, however, compared to London (my home town) transport and eating out are fairly reasonable.

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
You have to rent your own accommodation usually and this is done either with help from the school teachers/directors, local newspapers and websites.

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Fara in Sabina, Italy?
Good weather, good food, good wine, lovely countryside, historic cities and wonderful people.

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in Fara in Sabina, Italy?
The cost of living is increasing although not comparable to the UK.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Fara in Sabina, Italy?
Italy is a fantastic country to live in but bureaucracy is a nightmare. Arm yourself with tonnes of patience.

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
The BBC.

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Italy?
Unlikely to ever leave, but would miss the good weather.

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country?
You can buy most things except decent teabags and marmite!

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Liz

Nationality: English

Students I’ve taught in Italy: Pre-school / kindergarten (4-6 years), elementary (6-12 years), junior high school (12-15 years), high school (15-18 years), university, adults, business, other (please state):

Where I teach: I run my own business. Teaching here for 5 years.

How I found my current jobs: Self employed.

My school facilities: Good – Technology access is not as far advanced as it could be in most language schools.

Teacher support at my school: Training / workshops. 
 

Do you teach English in Italy?

Tell us about your experiences – click here to submit your report about teaching English in Italy.

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Teaching English in Italy – Prato

Published: 21 June, 2016  |  Last updated: 16 September, 2016

Teaching English in Prato, Italy

prato-Italy

Report submitted on 17 Jan, 2016 by Giulia.

Teaching English in Prato, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Prato, Italy?
Bringing their CV personally to the schools.

The main English teaching jobs available are:
Part time English language school positions, teaching at kindergartens / pre-schools, private teaching (not through a school, agency, etc.)

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
Native or nearnative language proficiency, TEFL or CELTA.

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
TEFL or CELTA.

What are the levels of payment?
Around 15€/hour (approx. 17 US$) in private schools, around 25€/h (approx. 28 US$) in public schools through different “projects”.

How many teaching days a week is normal?
5 days per week.

How many face-to-face teaching hours a week is normal?
It depends.

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
Teachers are freelancers most of the time…

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Prato, Italy to teach English?
You should plan to stay for at least a school year, be flexible, be ready to work with kids and stand their parents 🙂 Love your job, be creative and with a strong teaching background.

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Prato, Italy?
It is personal and it depends on each of us, I don’t think it is relevant. What is negative to me might be positive to you. Come and see!!!

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Prato, Italy?
It is personal and it depends on each of us, I don’t think it is relevant. What is negative to me might be positive to you. Come and see!!!

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in your area?
It’s EFL, so the language acquisition is really slow, kids learn English at school but teachers are generally Maths teachers forced to learn English, so their teaching style is a bit… weird! Parents’ expectations are extremely high so you need to be really patient and clear.

 

Living in Prato, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
VISA

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
About 600€/month (approx. 677 US$).

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
Flat, you can easily find flats online or through local real estate agents.

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Prato, Italy?
Good food, nice weather, nice people.

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in Prato, Italy?
As I said… no stereotypes! 🙂

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Prato, Italy?
You should not expect to have a full time position tomorrow, you might be required to work in different parts of the city, perhaps you will need to work for more than a school in order to earn enough.

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
I’m Italian so I can’t help 🙂

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Italy?
I missed the city self, its multicultural environment, its critical points, the events and most of all the food!

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country?
It’s Europe so I think you can find everything you need.

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Giulia

Nationality:Italian

Students I’ve taught in Italy: babies (0-2 years), toddlers (2-4 years), pre-school / kindergarten (4-6 years), elementary (6-12 years), junior high school (12-15 years), high school (15-18 years), adults.

Where I teach: La Bottega delle Lingue in Prato. Teaching here for 5 years.

How I found my current jobs: Interview for a position at a different school (which I refused).

My school facilities: Very good – Teaching resources, technology access, classroom, teaching environment

Teacher support at my school: training / workshops, lesson observations, teacher evaluations, peer support / training
 

Do you teach English in Italy?

Tell us about your experiences – click here to submit your report about teaching English in Italy.

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Teaching English in Italy – Treviso

Published: 10 January, 2016  |  Last updated: 10 January, 2016

Teaching English in Treviso, Italy

 

Treviso, Italy

Report submitted on 24 November, 2015 by Elisa.

Teaching English in Treviso, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Treviso, Italy?
Usually online (tefl or schools’ websites).

The main English teaching jobs available are:
Full time English language school positions, part time English language school positions, teaching at private international schools, teaching at colleges / universities, private teaching (not through a school, agency, etc.)

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
CELTA, Experience, Native or Proficiency Level

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
CELTA, a 1- or 2-year experience (especially if you want to teach children). Many schools hire Native Speakers only but not all of them.

What are the levels of payment?
National Contract so 1,100-1,300 euros per month (according to HRS and experience).

How many teaching days a week is normal?
5 days per week

How many face-to-face teaching hours a week is normal?
23 hours per week.

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
Christmas (usually from the 23rd of Dec to the 6th of Jan), Easter (from Friday to Monday, included), Summer (two weeks in August).

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Treviso, Italy to teach English?
Choose a city that is connected (by train or plane) to the rest of the country and EU. Life in Rome and Milan might be expensive. So you should take that into consideration before applying for a job. The north might be better but winters are cold and people too sometimes. The south is beautiful and people are lovely.

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Treviso, Italy?
Italians are nice!

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Treviso, Italy?
Their English is not so good!

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in Treviso, Italy?
Treviso is a nice town, no challenges here!

 

Living in Treviso, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
I really don’t know but I guess so.  Non EU citizens would need a visa.

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
Rent is usually 500-600 euros per month (if you want to live on your own). If shared, a room could cost 350-450 euros.
Life is not so expensive here. Treviso is a small town.

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
The school usually helps you with accommodation.

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Treviso, Italy?
People, food, fun! and a lot of SUN!

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in Treviso, Italy?
People might be cold at first but Italians are lovely!

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Treviso, Italy?
Just come over and enjoy it!

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
Well, I’m half Italian and half American so I’m happy here!

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Treviso, Italy?
I’m not planning on leaving at the moment!

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country?
An Italian dictionary!

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Elisa

Nationality: Italian

Students I’ve taught in Italy: Elementary (6-12 years), junior high school (12-15 years), high school (15-18 years), university, adults, business.

How I found my current teaching job(s): Through my CELTA course.  Working here for 1 year.

My school facilities: Good – technology access and school library could be improved.

Teacher support at my school: Training / workshops, lesson observations, teacher evaluations.

 

Do you teach English in Italy?

Tell us about your experiences – click here to submit your report about teaching English in Italy.

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Teaching English in Italy – Piacenza

Published: 23 December, 2015  |  Last updated: 23 December, 2015

Teaching English in Piacenza, Italy

 

Piacenza, Italy

Report submitted on 09 Novenmber, 2015 by Ashley.

Teaching English in Piacenza, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Piacenza, Italy?
There are so many English schools here who are always looking for ‘mother tongue’ speakers.

The main English teaching jobs available are:
Teaching at private international schools, teaching at companies, private teaching (not through a school, agency, etc.)

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
Depends on the situation. At most private English teaching schools the only requirement is that you are a mother tongue speaker. To enter the state school system you would need a recognised TEFL diploma.

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
TELF diploma

How many teaching days a week is normal?
5 days per week.

How many face-to-face teaching hours a week is normal?
10 hours per week.

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
School holidays here are over 3 months of summer. Most people are away during this time so it would be quite hard to find work. There are some English summer camps but they usually start at the beginning of September just before school opens.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Piacenza, Italy to teach English?
Italian parents are desperate for their children to learn English so there is plenty of work but with the current economic crisis they are restricted financially.

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Piacenza, Italy?
They are really enthusiastic about learning the language.

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Piacenza, Italy?
They don’t want to pay!

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in your area?
The in-school level of English is way below the international average so you have to start right from the beginning.

 

Living in Piacenza, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
Not if you are English or from within the EU. I couldn’t answer for other countries.

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
Italy is beginning more expensive everyday. Taxes are very high, making day to day living comparable to London!

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
Italians generally live at home until they are married so it can be quite hard to find a flat share but rents are still fairly reasonable.

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Piacenza, Italy?
The food, the wine, it’s Italy!!!

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in Piacenza, Italy?
The economy. Italy and the Italians are having a really hard time. No one can afford to pay the taxes and live!

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Piacenza, Italy?
Be prepared to step back in time!

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
Food. Speaking English. Sensation that there is always something new happening.

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Piacenza, Italy?
The weather

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country?
With the Internet you can get most things delivered. The one thing that I stock up on is my preferred brands of medicines, especially for the children.

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Ashley

Nationality: English

Students I’ve taught in Italy: Toddlers (2-4 years), pre-school / kindergarten (4-6 years), elementary (6-12 years), junior high school (12-15 years).

Where I teach: I have opened my own private school. I have about 15 students a week. Working here for 1 year.

My school facilities: Adequate – As it’s my own school I have to source everything myself.

Teacher support at my school: None.

 

Do you teach English in Italy?

Tell us about your experiences – click here to submit your report about teaching English in Italy.

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Teaching English in Italy – Turin (Report 2)

Published: 15 March, 2015  |  Last updated: 15 March, 2015

Teaching English in Turin, Italy

 

Turin, Italy

Report submitted on 08 March, 2015 by Stefi.

Teaching English in Turin, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Turin, Italy?
Finding English schools on the internet.

The main English teaching jobs available are:
full time English language school positions, part time English language school positions, teaching at kindergartens / pre-schools, teaching at private international schools, teaching at companies, private teaching (not through a school, agency, etc.)

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
Mother tongue English speaker.

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
Any experience teaching (not necessarily English). Experience with children.

What are the levels of payment?
– private or for companies: 20-40 euro/hour
– private kindergarten/elementary school: 7-10 euro/hour
– English schools: 10-15 euro/hour

How many teaching days a week is normal?
5 days per week.

How many face-to-face teaching hours a week is normal?
30 hours per week.

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
If you’re under a full time contract, you get paid. If you do private lessons or work part time no paid holidays.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Turin, Italy to teach English?
Do private lessons!

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Turin, Italy?
Lots of work.

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Turin, Italy?
If you work for a school you don’t get paid very much.

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in your area?
The people are not exposed to English in their daily lives so learning is slow.

 

Living in Turin, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
Permesso di soggiorno (Premission to stay).

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
– rent: 250-400 euro/month
– food (eating at home): 20 euro/week
– eating out, entertainment: 20 euro/night

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
Renting a room in a house or renting an apartment.
bakeca.it
subito.it
easystanza.it

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Turin, Italy?
Not too big, not too small. Lots to do. Very economic.

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in Turin, Italy?
The attitude of the average person is: frustrated, a bit negative, and wound up.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Turin, Italy?
Don’t compare Italians and the systems here to the one’s in your home country. There are many great aspects to this country, as there are many bad ones. Don’t focus on the negative aspects.

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
Efficiency.

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Turin, Italy?
The culture.

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country?
English books!

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Stefi

Nationality: Canadian

Students I’ve taught in Italy: Toddlers (2-4 years), pre-school / kindergarten (4-6 years), elementary (6-12 years), junior high school (12-15 years), adults.

Where I teach: Privately. I used to work at a kindergarten and got all my contacts for private lessons through the school. Working here for 3 years.

How I found my current jobs: I started doing solely private lessons because I accumulated contacts during my time at the kindergarten.

My school facilities: Good – Private schools can vary. Some are very well-organized while others are not at all.

Teacher support at my school: Peer support / training.

 

Do you teach English in Italy?

Tell us about your experiences – click here to submit your report about teaching English in Italy.

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Teaching English in Italy – Pesaro

Published: 02 February, 2015  |  Last updated: 15 March, 2015

Teaching English in Pesaro, Italy

Pesaro, Italy

 

Report submitted on 02 February, 2015 by Frances McCusker.

Teaching English in Pesaro, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Pesaro, Italy?
They can apply directly to a private language school or present a project to the primary middle and secondary school. Many schools publicise on their websites and there is an official application form for this.

The main English teaching jobs available are:
Full time English language school positions, part time English language school positions, teaching at kindergartens / pre-schools, teaching at state schools, teaching at companies, private teaching (not through a school, agency, etc.)

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
In a language school they usually want a university degree and a TEFL teaching certificate.

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
In the private language school experience is not always essential as many of them have their own method and they usually provide some kind of training before the teacher starts.

What are the levels of payment?
– Private language school 12 euro per hour (approx)
– State school 20-40 euro per hour
– Companies 30-60 euro per hour

How many teaching days a week is normal?
5-6 days per week.

How many face-to-face teaching hours a week is normal?
30 hours per week.

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
Private language schools usually close in August but provide classes all year round. If a teacher needs a day off they are usually ok with this if another teacher is willing to cover.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Pesaro, Italy to teach English?
I would advise them to be careful when signing a contract with private language schools because they often exploit teachers by offering training and then asking them to pay for it if they don’t stay for a minimum time. Be clear about what would be acceptable to you from the beginning and insist on being paid every month for all the hours you work.

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Pesaro, Italy?
The possibility of teaching a wide variety of ages and backgrounds in different places.

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Pesaro, Italy?
Unsocial hours and often having last minute changes made to your timetable. Low pay in private language schools.

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in your area?
There aren’t any particular challenges as far as the students are concerned the challenges are dealing with the school management.

 

Living in Pesaro, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
For European citizens no but for outside the European union I imagine there would be some kind of visa requirement.

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
A typical rent would be about 500 euro per month but usually language schools will help the teacher find a flat share.
Eating out not expensive food and other necessities about comparable with The United Kingdom.

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
Usually teachers coming from abroad will flat share and language schools will usually help with this.

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Pesaro, Italy?
Safe environment. People are generally friendly. Good weather in summer with a beautiful beach and plenty of places to go in the evening.

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in Pesaro, Italy?
It’s quiet in winter and the weather can be very chilly and damp.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Pesaro, Italy?
Small Italian towns can be lonely places if you have no previous contacts.

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
Some food. Real pubs the British sense of humour

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Pesaro, Italy?
The climate and the food.

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country?
Nothing in particular.

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Frances McCusker

Nationality: British

Students I’ve taught in Italy: Pre-school / kindergarten (4-6 years), elementary (6-12 years), junior high school (12-15 years), high school (15-18 years), university, adults, business.

Where I teach: Elementary school Sacro cuore in Pesaro. Working here for 25 years.

How I found my current jobs: I was recommended by a teacher where I was doing a language project.

My school facilities: Good – Classroom, text books and technology.

Teacher support at my school: None.

 

Do you teach English in Italy?

Tell us about your experiences – click here to submit your report about teaching English in Italy.

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Teaching English in Italy – Perugia

Published: 21 December, 2014  |  Last updated: 21 December, 2014

Teaching English in Perugia, Italy

 Perugia, Italy

 

Report submitted on 21 December, 2014 by Carole.

Teaching English in Perugia, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Perugia, Italy?
There are many local private language schools. They don’t tend to advertise for teachers as they have a constant stream of people looking for jobs who contact them so all it takes is a phone call to the schools to express interest.

A notice in your local bar to find private pupils often works.

Word of mouth is king! Once you get started people find you out!

The main English teaching jobs available are:
Full time English language school positions, part time English language school positions, private teaching (not through a school, agency, etc.)

The language schools often give you the opportunity to work outside of the school at companies or where they get external contracts.

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
For private language schools TEFL is ok, but they often look for some sort of further education (degree level).
If you have good references and previous experience and TEFL you will find work.
To work in a state school in Italy is almost impossible as an incomer.

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
TEFL, C1 English, neutral accent, some experience

What are the levels of payment?
Terrible!! usually about €10 an hour net. If you get to work on specific programmes funded with European money that can jump to €20 an hour. But such work is rare. Most work in private schools is on a ‘casual contract’ basis. So no guarantee of hours! Sometimes you can negotiate a tax contribution from your employer which takes your gross hourly rate to about €15

How many teaching days a week is normal?
6 days per week.

How many face-to-face teaching hours a week is normal?
0-40 hours per week. Face to face teaching hours depends on part-time/full-time work – it could be anything up to 40 hours

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
Holidays are taken by arrangement and are not paid

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Italy to teach English?
Consider the location carefully. The north of Italy is rich, the south very poor (and I’m not just talking money!). Working in a city or working in a more rural region will give you different experiences. Outside of teaching what are your interests? Culture? try Florence or Venice …. Rural pursuits? Try central Umbria or the south.
Its easy to travel north/south in Italy. Harder to travel across west/east both on trains or roads. So position yourself where the life outside of teaching is stimulating for you.

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Perugia, Italy?
I teach mostly adults on a one to one basis. Occasional other conversation classes or project with groups of adults so I get an insight into all areas of Italian life, education and their values. Its stimulating and challenging. I teach my mother tongue but for me teaching is very much a two way experience. I learn so much everyday! and so I receive as well as give.

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Perugia, Italy?
Living in Italy is enthralling on a good day and the most frustrating experience on this planet on a bad day. That carries through work and living. The Italians are delightful. Their processes are terrible. Face to face with the student – great. Trying to negotiate fair treatment for yourself? Good luck with that!

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in your area?
The challenges of teaching are the same where ever you are. Mostly I am teaching people who want to learn and who are paying for the privilege so that’s an easy situation. You need to be inventive and interesting as a person and in your teaching and need the psychology to get the best out of your pupils whoever they are.
The people I teach, even the very well educated ones (lawyers, solicitors, politicians, doctors, engineers) are in general very unaware of the world outside of Italy. They don’t travel widely (except for city culture) or read widely or consider the rest of the world. That’s challenging!! They believe (conditioned from an early age) that Italy is the best – but they don’t know what the rest of the world holds!! That’s my biggest challenge.

 

Living in Perugia, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
Europeans can live and work here. After 3 months you should become a resident … and the current tax laws mean that if you work here and live here for the majority of the year you must declare WORLD WIDE income and be taxed accordingly.
EH1C covers you for medical care for 3 months, then once a resident you should be able to access the Health Service System. But it isn’t always easy. And it is not free at point of contact like in UK. You pay a contribution for every blood test, xray etc …. and that can add up.

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
If you live a careful and simple life style it is ok. If you need a car insurance is astronomical! In general I would say the cost of living is quite high. But it depends what you are comparing it too! Compared with UK food and clothes are expensive. There are many ‘hidden’ costs to existing even quite simply.

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
There is much accommodation to rent. The cost depends on location and standard you require. There are letting agencies, newspaper ads and often local universities or language schools have lists of possible accommodation. Again word or mouth, if you get talking in the local bar or know anyone locally…….

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Perugia, Italy?
The challenge of living in a different country. The need to open your mind and heart and embrace your host countries way of doing things.
Access to a different culture.
Seasons! It is hot in summer and cold in winter and wet at other times.

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in Perugia, Italy?
The red tape, expense of living.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Perugia, Italy to live?
Don’t come here chasing a dream. If you do, you will be disappointed. And probably find yourself in a nightmare!!
Be pragmatic. Plan. Plan for the best and for the worst as you will experience both.

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
The ease of being able to use my own language, specially when I am tired or ill.
Theatre and entertainment.
Concerts – music of all types being easily accessible

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country (e.g. things that are difficult to get in your location)?
Other than essential personal possessions don’t do that! if you are coming here embrace what there is here!
Or have I misunderstood the question? This is Italy – mid Europe. You can get all you need, if not all you want!

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Perugia, Italy?
I have no plans to leave Italy. I cant envisage a situation that would allow me to return to the UK

Other comments:
It can be wonderful, but it isn’t easy. So think hard before you make your decision. Once your decision is made throw yourself into with gusto and enjoy!

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Carole

Nationality: British

Students I’ve taught in Italy: Pre-school / kindergarten (4-6 years), elementary (6-12 years), junior high school (12-15 years), high school (15-18 years), university, adults, business.

Where I teach: Oxford Language School, Master School 2000, Perugia. I also teach privately – all my private students are adult, professionals, under 50 years old.  Working here for 4 years.

How I found my current jobs: Oxford school had been given my name and they phoned me. Oxford School recommended me to Master School 2000.
I was recommended to private pupils via social contacts..

My school facilities: Adequate – We need to move to Digital books, avoid photocopying, need sound proof rooms and a staff room.

Teacher support at my school: Peer support / training.

 

Do you teach English in Italy?

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Teaching English in Italy – Turin (Report 1)

Published: 26 November, 2014  |  Last updated: 11 October, 2016

Teaching English in Turin, Italy

 

Turin, Italy

Report submitted on 26 November, 2014 by Rachel.

Teaching English in Turin, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Turin, Italy?
Go to local language schools to get first contacts with the English speaking community.

The main English teaching jobs available are:
Agencies (send teachers to different locations), teaching at kindergartens / pre-schools, teaching at state schools, private teaching (not through a school, agency, etc.).

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
TEFL certificate or a degree if you want to teach in schools.

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
TEFL.

What are the levels of payment?
10-30 euros per hour.

How many teaching days a week is normal?
5 days per week.

How many face-to-face teaching hours a week is normal?
25 hours per week.

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
Depends on the position. Schools have a 3 month break, so you can get work at summer camps.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Turin, Italy to teach English?
It’s a great job, if you are independent, and willing to look around.

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Turin, Italy?
Lots of jobs.

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Turin, Italy?
Lots of language schools offer low wages.

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in your area?
Italians are very good at grammar, so you need to know your English grammar.

 

Living in Turin, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
Depends where you come from.

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
Quite low, good quality food, inexpensive to eat out.

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
Ask an agency or contact an aupair agency.

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Turin, Italy?
Great food, lovely helpful people.

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in Turin, Italy?
Confusing shop opening hours.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Turin, Italy to live?
Come, its great! Interesting cultural city.

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
Knowing how to go about the bureaucratic side of things.

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country (e.g. things that are difficult to get in your location)?
Marmite.

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Turin, Italy?
The food and mountains.

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Rachel

Nationality: British

Students I’ve taught in Italy: Toddlers (2-4 years), pre-school / kindergarten (4-6 years), elementary (6-12 years), junior high school (12-15 years), high school (15-18 years), adults, business.

Where I teach: Language school called FIAT. Working here for 15 years.  I teach privately too www.englishsummercamp.eu

How I found my current jobs: Through a friend / Fulfilling a need.

My school facilities: Very good – Hours come in a block, books provided.

Teacher support at my school: training / workshops.

 

Do you teach English in Italy?

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Teaching English in Italy – Taranto, Puglia

Published: 25 October, 2014  |  Last updated: 25 October, 2014

Teaching English in Taranto, Italy

 

Taranto, Italy

Report submitted on 24 October, 2014 by Virginia.

Teaching English in Taranto, Italy:

How can teachers find teaching jobs in Taranto, Italy?
I am not sure, I found this job through a contact that my husband has at work. Word of mouth.

The main English teaching jobs available are:
Part time English language school positions, agencies (send teachers to different locations), private teaching (not through a school, agency, etc.).

What are the minimum teaching requirements?
I think that they are mainly looking for native speakers, though having a certification is also helpful.

What teaching requirements would you recommend?
ESL certification or teaching experience.

What are the levels of payment?
16 euros an hour (approx. US$20)

How many teaching days a week is normal?
5 days per week.

What is the normal arrangement for holidays?
I am not sure, I don’t work many hours since I have a young child.  National Italian holidays are respected, and I would assume that August would be time off as well.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Taranto, Italy to teach English?
Don’t expect to make a lot of money, though if you have the time, they will have you work a lot of hours. Most classes are in the evening, it is difficult to find classes to teach in the morning.

What are the positive aspects of teaching English in Taranto, Italy?
People really want to learn.

What are the negative aspects for teaching English in Taranto, Italy?
No complaints.

What are some of the teaching challenges for English teachers teaching the local people in your area?
No complaints.

 

Living in Taranto, Italy:

Are there any visa or other legal requirements to live in Italy?
If you are not a citizen of the EU, you will need a visa to live in Italy and permesso di soggiorno once you arrive. If you work less than 20 hours a week, you can come on a student visa, otherwise you need a work visa.

What is the cost of living like in Italy?
In this part of Italy, which is very rural, the cost of living is low.

What are the usual accommodation arrangements and how can you find accommodation?
I am not sure, I am here with my family since my husband’s job sent him here on assignment.

Other than teaching, what positive aspects are there for living in Taranto, Italy?
It is beautiful and the food is amazing.

Other than teaching, what negative aspects are there for living in Taranto, Italy?
It is very remote.

What advice would you give to someone considering coming to Taranto, Italy to live?
Learn a little Italian before you come and be flexible.

What things do you miss most (other than family and friends) from your home country?
Diversity.

What things would you recommend to new teachers in your area to bring with them from their home country (e.g. things that are difficult to get in your location)?
Books in English.

What do you think you will miss most when (or if) you leave Taranto, Italy?
The food.

 

About Me and My Work:

My Name: Virginia

Nationality: USA

Students I’ve taught in Italy: Toddlers (2-4 years), pre-school / kindergarten (4-6 years), adults.

Where I teach: Accentò in Martina Franca. Working here for 1 year.

How I found my current jobs: Word of mouth.

My school facilities: Very good classrooms and resources.

Teacher support at my school: training / workshops.

Link: http://italicious.wordpress.com/

 

Do you teach English in Italy?

Tell us about your experiences – click here to submit your report about teaching English in Italy.

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